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Why I Had to Look Twice at Weltec’s 2nd Biogas Plant in South Korea

WELTEC anaerobic digestion in Korea

Starting from the early summer of 2016, the operator will supply the stainless-steel digester with its capacity of almost 4,000 m³ with 100 tons of organic waste a day, whereof 70 % are pig manure.

When I received the press release which follows below, from Weltec I read the title quickly and took it to mean, that their new biogas plant was only the second in all of South Korea. Korea is an advanced nation I thought! How can that be correct?

Yes. I was Wrong!

Of course it isn’t correct and I had misread the headline.

In case you read their headline (as copied below) in the same way, let me tell you that it is Weltec’s 2nd biogas plant in that nation, and NOT the second that the South Korean’s have built. But, don’t let that leave you thinking it isn’t a newsworthy achievement. On the contrary, it is quite an significant achievement. There must be very many companies in South Korea which could have built a well-engineered biogas plant similar to this, but Weltec got the job, and not them.

Further Research

I researched the web to find out how many biogas plants they do already have in S. Korea (Korea) and found that there is a free Anaerobic Digestion report on the IEA Energy Technology Network website, dated October of this year that puts the total number of biogas plants in 2014 (not including landfill sites producing energy from landfill gas) at 71.

Most of those biogas plants are sewage sludge digesters, and according to the report only 26 are either biowaste or agricultural digesters. I assume that the Weltec Plant would be classed as a biowaste/ agricultural digester, but the Press Release below does not say. Nevertheless. They do tell us that it is being built for a transformer manufacturer, which must make for an unusual client given that it is not clear what organic waste the client would be producing in-house to feed this new digester. (I will try to find out from Weltec more about the feedstock used, and if I do I will post a comment to explain.)

There is apparently a lot of potential for further anaerobic digestion plant projects in South Korea, judging by the size of the population about 51 million (according to Weltec).

WELTEC BIOPOWER Erects Second Biogas Plant in South Korea

WELTEC biogas in Korea

The plant site is located about 80 km north of the capital Seoul, in Gyeonggi-do province.

In October 2015, the construction work for an anaerobic digestion plant from German manufacturer WELTEC BIOPOWER started in South Korea. The plant site is located about 80 km north of the capital Seoul, in Gyeonggi-do province. The 450-kW biogas plant is to go live in the early summer of 2016. The highly developed technology with smart control will ensure a high level of efficiency of the second South Korean WELTEC plant.

In South Korea, major investments are made in the energy sector, and the development of renewable energy sources has been a top priority for several years. For good reason: The republic with its population of 51 million is one of the world’s 10 largest power consumers. However, the country does not have any significant fossil resources and is forced to import 97 percent of its conventional energy sources.

One of the reasons why WELTEC BIOPOWER attracted the attention of the transformer manufacturer, who assumes the role of investor and operator of the new biogas plant, was that the German plant manufacturer had already built a biogas plant in the south of the country back in 2012. However, the customer’s final decision in favour of WELTEC was based on the fact that the technical plant concept for the new project is custom-tailored to the region’s special needs and South Korea’s ecological goals. The sustainable waste disposal concept and the efficient processing of the input substances into high-nutrient fertiliser were decisive factors, explains Harro Brons, the project manager of WELTEC BIOPOWER.

WELTEC anaerobic digestion in Korea

Starting from the early summer of 2016, the operator will supply the stainless-steel digester with its capacity of almost 4,000 m³ with 100 tons of organic waste a day, whereof 70 % are pig manure.

Starting from the early summer of 2016, the operator will supply the stainless-steel digester with its capacity of almost 4,000 m3 with 100 tons of organic waste a day, whereof 70 % are pig manure. This feedstock will be converted into biogas and high-quality fertiliser by anaerobic digestion. Subsequently, the fertiliser will be stored in two stainless-steel digestate storage units of 5,590 m3 each until it is used. The generated biogas will be used to operate a combined heat and power plant with an electrical output of 450 kilowatt. The power will be fed directly into the power grid. The heat will be used for heating the company buildings and for internal processes.

 

WELTEC south korea biogas plant panel

In South Korea, the optimum function of the components will
be controlled by the PLC-based LoMOS control, which is custom developed
by WELTEC.

Doubtlessly, the key to the high performance of this biogas plant is the deployed technology. In South Korea, the optimum function of the components will be controlled by the PLC-based LoMOS control, which is custom-developed by WELTEC. The precise plant control enables a high degree of automation and optimum remote maintenance. To make the user interface as user-friendly as possible, a special detail has been taken into consideration: For this project, we programmed the control in Korea, says Harro Brons. Thus, the basis has been established for the smooth operation and the first steps to achieve South Korea’s energy goals.

For more information about anaerobic digestion plant manufacturer and installer WELTEC visit: www.weltec-biopower.de

Weltec has done it again! They have been given repeat business, this time in France. See our article about it here.

How Does a Biogas Plant Work?

Read more about Weltec Biopower here:
http://blog.anaerobic-digestion.com/anaerobic-digestion/weltec-biopower-piddlehinton-ad-plant-extension

How does a biogas plant work? - is explained in this animated whiteboard video

The basic principle is quite simple. Renewable input (feed) materials (know as substrate) from farming, animal manures and waste materials from the food and agricultural industry sectors serve as input materials.

A biogas plant comprises of a biogas digester where the organic waste (substrate) decomposes (ferments) and emits biogas. To do this the organic waste is collected and allowed to decompose with the use of bacteria, at a raised temperature. The biogas produced is nothing but methane and carbon dioxide, with some impurities.

This process (known as anaerobic digestion) is one of the least expensive and effective ways to produce energy that can be used for electrical power generation, or burnt directly for cooking and lighting. A very useful by-product is digestate, which can be used as a very valuable organic manure which is used in agriculture. A high standard of process control is needed to ensure an optimal fermentation with a maximum output of biogas from the incoming substrates.

This animation explains how a biogas plant works throughout the biogas production process, using a flow chart by Weltec Biopower. http://www.weltec-biopower.com/How-does-a-biogas-plant-work.1080.0.html

While viewing it, the viewer is shown the biogas plant throughout the process from the delivery of feedstock to the output of the digestate, and the products from electricity to the grid, to CHP. This biogas film is useful for everyone, who would like to to know about commercial biogas disgesters.

The variety of economic and ecological benefits a waste fed biogas plant affords are wide and plentiful. Many farmers set up biogas plants as a further source of income. Utilising renewable raw materials and other agricultural products contributes to the value creation potential of this technology. Anaerobic digestion is increasing and helping nations to set up an efficient recycling economy.

This biogas film should be useful for everyone, who would like to understand what a biogas plant is and how it works. If you are farmer, energy provider or disposer you may find this video useful. Furthermore, this biogas video can be excellent for school lessons and university students.

The video was created by:
http://blog.anaerobic-digestion.com/

Visit Weltec Biopower here:
http://www.weltec-biopower.com/

This video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy1EIXIS1JQ

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3 Responses to Why I Had to Look Twice at Weltec’s 2nd Biogas Plant in South Korea

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