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Image text: "Use of Biomethane Decarbonises Heavy Vehicles Now!"

Use of Biomethane Decarbonises Heavy Vehicles Now – Why Wait?

Today a new report has been announced which adds to the chorus of voices saying that the UK government and business community should promote the use of biomethane (purified biogas/ renewable compressed natural gas rCNG) for its ability to decarbonises all types of heavy vehicles now.

We say:

“Why would anyone wait for an as-yet unproven new technology to start serious decarbonisation when there is a tried and tested method available right now?”

Biomethane report on decarbonisationThere is much popular pressure for the UK government to go faster to net-zero than 2050, but speeding up decarbonisation via other technologies will be much harder to achieve quickly. Read the ADBA Press Release below to find out why:


ADBA Press Release 23 June 2021:

“Biomethane the key option to decarbonise heavy vehicles immediately,” says trade body in a new publication:

  •  Biomethane: Fuelling a Transport Revolution reviews how the anaerobic digestion and biogas industry can help decarbonise heavier modes of transport, such as trucks and buses, much sooner than electricity or hydrogen.
  • The Policy Briefing report by the Anaerobic Digestion and Bioresources Association (ADBA) details the GHG emissions issues facing the UK transport sector and explores the solutions available for heavy goods and public transport vehicles, which alone generate 20% of current emissions per year.
  • Rapid deployment of biomethane for HGVs could reduce GHG emissions by 38% over the next 10 years. Current technological barriers to powering heavy vehicles with electricity or hydrogen mean these future fuels could only cut emissions by 6% over the same period.
  • Major fleet operators are already making the transition to biomethane trucks and buses.
  • Fuelling HGVs with biomethane can cut well-to-wheel emissions by 80% per km driven and greatly improve air quality.
  • As well as decarbonising transport, biomethane can boost an entire economic sector, with ROI for hauliers achieved within two years of operation.

Earlier this month, the Anaerobic Digestion and Bioresources Association (ADBA) launched a Policy Briefing report demonstrating the crucial role biomethane could play in decarbonising transport in the UK in the short term.

In the first of a series of Policy Briefing Events, the trade body presented: Biomethane: Fuelling a Transport Revolution. A report that analyses the UK transport sector's issues facing the by exploring the options presented by electric vehicles, hydrogen and biomethane.

The research highlights the value of biomethane in providing a green fuel alternative for heavy good and public transport vehicles – immediately.

Trucks and buses currently generate 20% of the UK's greenhouse gas emissions from transport, which is itself the highest GHG emitting sector in the UK (27%).

Charlotte Morton presents on biogas future prospects Transport is the most polluting sector and its GHG emissions levels have not changed over the past decade.

, explains Charlotte Morton, ADBA's Chief Executive.

Biomethane is ready to be produced, ready to be used, and can decarbonise heavy vehicles transport here and now. At a time when the pollution levels exceed WHO guidelines on 97% of UK roads, we can not afford to wait 15-20 years for electricity or hydrogen solutions to become ready.

A 2020 report by Element Energy shows that rapid deployment of biomethane for HGVs would reduce emissions by 38% over 10 years, whilst waiting for hydrogen/electric HGVs to be manufactured would deliver only 6% over the same period.

Biomethane is particularly appropriate for public transport, long-haul logistics and food distribution vehicles. Household names and cities such as ASDA, Royal Mail, Nottingham City Transport and Liverpool City Council are already making the transition for their delivery fleets and buses.

The report reveals that fuelling HGVs with biomethane can cut well-to-wheel emissions by 80% per km driven, compared to diesel, and that the Return On Investment (ROI) for fleet operators is achieved within two years.

Using biomethane as a transport fuel is an immediate “no regrets” option that not only contributes to significant cuts in GHG emissions from HGVs but also stimulates continued growth in the UK biomethane sector,”

says Philip Fjeld, CEO of CNG-Fuels.

As the refuelling network expands across the UK, biomethane as a transport fuel will become a win-win solution that is available to all hauliers and that continues to reduce the carbon footprint of a sector that has always been seen as very hard to decarbonise“.

With the launch of the CNHi Biomethane tractor and small scale on-site methanation units, agriculture could be the next sector to benefit from the availability of biomethane to reduce its GHG emissions.

Therefore, the biomethane sector is primed to play an increasingly crucial role in helping the UK achieve its Net Zero targets by 2030.

DOWNLOAD THE ADBA POLICY BRIEFING
Biomethane: Fuelling the Transport Revolution

– ADBA PR ENDS –

Image text: "Use of Biomethane Decarbonises Heavy Vehicles Now!"

For further information, contact:

Jocelyne Bia, Senior Communications Consultant
email: Jocelyne.bia@adbioresources.org ; tel: 00 44 7910 878510

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