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Landia Pasteurizers Delivered to Romanian WtE Biogas Plant

Landia Pasteurizers have been delivered to a Romanian WtE Biogas Plant. Pasteurizers fitted to anaerobic digestion plants as they will be at this plant in Romania, perform the function of destroying any unwanted disease-carrying organisms, bacteria, and virus particles which might be in the incoming waste fed into the biogas plant.  After pasteurizing the output for the AD Plant (digestate) can be used for a far wider range of fertilizer and soil-improvement uses and hence there are many good reasons for installing a pasteurized at biogas plants.

The plug-in-and-play Biochop can treat both slaughterhouse and food waste for flows in excess of 300 tonnes per day.

Delivered complete with a user-friendly control system for regulation, monitoring and registration of the hygienisation process, the Landia BioChop also benefits from having no moving parts inside the pasteurizers. There is no need to enter the tank to carry out maintenance.


Press Release 2 September 2020:

New Romanian waste-to-energy plant to benefit from Landia pasteurizers.

For a new state-of-the-art waste-to-energy biogas plant in Romania, Landia has been chosen to supply two of its 25m3 pasteurizers.

The Landia BioChop units will play a crucial role in eliminating biohazards by heating biomass to a minimum of 72°C for one-hour batch processes – allowing the final digestate to be utilized safely as a high-quality fertilizer.

Ready to go. Landia BioChop units (one is visible here as the black unit mounted beneath the pasteuriser tank) will play a key role at a new waste-to-energy plant in Romania.

Equipped with a Landia chopper pump and a Landia side-entry mixer, the plug-in-and-play Biochop can treat both slaughterhouse and food waste for flows in excess of 300 tonnes per day.

Delivered complete with a user-friendly control system for regulation, monitoring and registration of the hygienisation process, the Landia BioChop also benefits from having no moving parts inside the pasteurizers, so there is no need to enter the tank to carry out maintenance.

In addition to the externally-mounted chopper pump (that reduces particle sizes) and side-entry propeller mixer, the Landia pasteurizer is also supplied with an integral heating jacket as part of its very solid and compact design for high treatment capacity.

Image shows: Landias pasteurizers bound for Romania, where they will eliminate biohazards at a new waste-to-energy plant.
Landia pasteurizers bound for Romania, where they will eliminate biohazards at a new waste-to-energy plant.

In the lower part of the BioChop, the Landia chopper pump ensures the comprehensive circulation of the biomass, preventing dead zones in the tank. At the same time, it constantly reduces particle size for optimization of the heating process and the supply of suitably homogenised feedstock for the digesters. The chopper pump can also be used for emptying of the tank – typically achieved in just a few minutes.

Meanwhile, the angled, side-entry Landia mixer further enhances movement in the tank, with every unit, including propeller, customised for each specific project.

www.landiaworld.com

PR ends


Biogas in Romania

The nation is no stranger to anaerobic digestion and biogas production. In Romania large and small capacity AD Plants were built as part of the national plan for biogas 1958-1982:

  1. Coupled with water treatment plants for sewage sludge treatment prior to disposal.
  2. As the development of facilities for use in the farming sector (including small biogas units).

The results of the program which ran for 30 years was the development of a total of 400 facilities, with a total energy production of 0.18 TWh*year-1.

The main drawback of this project was the fact that the owner was the State, through the state-owned companies. After the fall of the regime in 1989, a long process of reorganisation, privatisation and liquidation of those companies occurred, having as result a gradual depreciation and demolition of the worn-out biogas facilities. Virtually, no plant from the 400 developed still existed in 2008.

The opportunities for biogas production in the BiG>East target countries are very high, especially in the waste treatment (WtE) sector. Implementation will enable efficient and environmentally sustainable waste disposal, while at the same time generating a significant amount of energy in a manner that aids the region’s responsibility to reduce and offset its carbon footprint. Generally, the countries involved have good infrastructure and framework for waste collection as well as lots of potential in growing energy cops [coupled with animal slurry digestate as fertiliser].

Biogas systems using energy crops as feedstock are robust simple and reliable technology. Waste treating biogas systems are more complicated because of contaminants removal, but the working principle is the same. The organic material is broken down in large tanks in an anaerobic process resulting in the formation of methane gas which is then used as a fuel to drive an electric generator.

Greenhouse gas benefits are derived from the capturing of methane gas which would otherwise be liberated in a landfill process and further, the conversion of methane to CO2 in the combustion process. This is an important issue as CO2 is a much less potent greenhouse gas than methane. Although CO2 is released during energy production the carbon is largely offset by the carbon sequestered in the growing process of the organics in the waste and the agricultural products. The spent slurry material at the end of the biogas process known as digestate can be separated into a solid material which forms rich and productive compost, and a liquid rich in nutrients suitable for direct application to farmland as a liquid fertiliser.

The conditions for biogas production in Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Latvia, Romania, and Slovenia are very favourable. However, the question is which technologies are most promising for the utilisation of the produced biogas?

In general, biogas is an energy carrier which can be used for several energy applications. This includes electricity generation, heat production, combined heat and power production (CHP), and transport applications. These technologies are described in the BiG>East Handbook which is available on the BiG>East website www.big-east.eu.

Biogas upgrading to natural gas quality (biomethane) and feed-in into the natural gas grid is described in the BiG>East report “Biogas purification and assessment of the natural gas grid in Southern and Eastern Europe”, also available at the BiG>East website. Anyhow, this technology is rather new and needs more development. Implementing the biogas upgrading technology can only be recommended in very special cases and in countries with existing experience in biogas production like in Germany where 22 biogas upgrading plants are currently being installed.

When the waste streams are correctly sorted and processed there is no need for landfill and the goal must be to completely stop disposing of waste this way.

With the right incentives, programs and engineering, the outputs from waste should be:

(1) recycled/reused material,
(2) energy,
(3) compost and fertiliser, or
(4) products for incineration (in small cases where the first two methods are unachievable).

Biogas systems offer all target countries a primary means of waste disposal, extracting the organic and biodegradable fractions from the waste. The non-biodegradable components extracted can be filtered into recycling facilities. The systems can be adapted in size and design to meet all the listed applications whether they are municipal, industrial or agricultural wastes. via www.big-east.eu

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